10 Best All Mountain Skis For 2023

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10 Best All Mountain Skis For 2023

All-mountain skis are great for people looking to buy their first skis or those who want one pair to do it all. There are three major types of skis, all measured by their width. Skis that are too thin will sink underneath any fresh snow, and skis that are too wide won’t be able to stay stable in hardpack or icy conditions. All-mountains are in the goldilocks zone, right in the middle.

The all-mountain category is unique because of its high level of usability. You won’t be getting the fastest or best powder ski on the market, but you will get consistency across the majority of snow conditions out there. A solid all-mountain ski can become your daily driver, providing consistent performance across the board for multiple years.

My Review Process

Buying skis can be like fumbling through a maze with a blindfold on. There’s a ton of information, and it’s very easy to make a purchase without considering all the relevant factors. After skiing for 25 years, I’m here to present the best options with easy-to-understand positives and negatives.

Below the reviews, you can find our buying guide, where we go into the details of what you should look for. For those interested in the technical details, each selection below has the data listed to help you make your purchase. If you don’t know what a term means, an explanation will be included in our buying guide.

Nordica Enforcer 100

Best Overall All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Nordica Enforcer 100
Pros

Maneuverable in tight spaces

Stable at speeds

Fun to carve with

Handles firm snow conditions well

Good flotation in low-medium powder

Cons

Not a beginner or intermediate ski

The Nordica Enforcer 100s are my choice for the best all-mountain skis. These skis are maneuverable, stable at higher speeds, and fun to carve with. More importantly, they can handle less-than-ideal conditions like crud, hardpack, and choppy snow.

The biggest downside is that these skis aren't as forgiving as others, making them harder for beginners and intermediate skiers to control. The Nordica Enforcer 100s offer a lot but demand a skier with strong fundamentals. Having said that, at 100 millimeters underfoot, the width hits the sweet spot for a wide variety of conditions.

This is a true all-mountain ski, offering dependability across the board. If you’re looking for one pair of skis to rely on, the Nordica Enforcer 100s are a great bet for advanced and expert skiers.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 165, 172, 179, 186, 191 cm
  • Tip width: 132, 132.5, 133, 133.5 mm
  • Waist width: 100 mm—
  • Tail width: 118, 120, 120.5, 121, 121.5 mm
  • Turning radius: Medium (17-22 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Nordica Enforcer 100

Volkl M6 Mantra

Best Runner Up

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Volkl M6 Mantra
Pros

Great for aggressive skiers

Maneuverable

Precision carving

Effective quiver of one

Cons

Stiff, not for beginners

Tough to control on ice

I don’t always include a runner-up category, but the Volkl M6 Mantra needs to be talked about. These stellar skis are great for aggressive skiers because they’re stable at high speeds, fun to carve on, and quite maneuverable in bumps and trees.

The M6 Mantras don’t handle ice very well, and their stiff design means they’re less playful than other options. However, if you are an advanced or expert skier with strong fundamentals, you’ll have a blast breaking the speed limit on a pair of Volkl Mantra M6s.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 163, 170, 177, 184, 191 cm
  • Tip width: 135mm–
  • Waist width: 96mm–
  • Tail width: 119mm–
  • Turning radius: Medium (17-22 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Volkl M6 Mantra

K2 Mindbender 85

Best Budget & Beginner All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - K2 Mindbender 85
Pros

Easy to control

Good for tricks & jumps

Lightweight

Can handle variable conditions

Carves well

Cons

Too thin for deep snow

Bouncy in tough conditions

The K2 Mindbenders are an awesome budget ski purchase that should appeal to a range of skiing styles and skill levels. They’ll also last for multiple seasons, which gives them excellent value for the money.

The Mindbenders are easy skis to control with a short turn radius, a lighter weight profile, and quick edge-to-edge transitions. They’re growers that you can keep in your effective quiver for years.

The downsides are the narrow waist width, which will sink in deep powder, and the lightweight construction, which means the skis get batted around in crud and uneven conditions. However, for beginner skiers, these small issues won't override the carving ability, easy handling, and terrain park playfulness.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 156, 163, 170, 177 cm
  • Tip width:  130mm–
  • Waist width: 85mm–
  • Tail width: 113mm–
  • Turning radius: Short (~15 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

K2 Mindbender 85

Santa Ana 98

Best Women’s All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Santa Ana 98
Pros

Versatile ski

Dependable

Can handle firm snow conditions and crud

Decent float in deeper snow

Precision carving

Cons

Jack of all trades, master of none

After already making a splash with the Enforcer 100, Nordica is back with the best women’s all-mountain skis, the Santa Ana 98s. If you value versatility and dependability, these skis are for you. The Santa Ana 98s carve well, provide decent float in powder due to the 98 mm width, and can ski firm snow.

As is typical for the all-mountain category, the Santa Ana can hang with most skis. However, if you want the absolute best pair of skis in each category of ski terrain, the Santa Ana falls a bit short. But if you want a pair of skis to carry you through multiple seasons, the Santa Ana 98s hit the sweet spot.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 151, 158, 165, 172, 179 cm
  • Tip width: 130, 130.5, 131, 132, 132.5 mm
  • Waist width: 98mm–
  • Tail width: 117, 117.5, 118, 120, 120.5 mm
  • Turning radius: Short (10-16 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Santa Ana 98

Elan Ripstick 96

Most Playful All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Elan Ripstick 96
Pros

Good powder flotation

Very fun and responsive

Lightweight

Great for bump skiing and tree skiing

Good carving ability

Cons

Uncomfortable skiing on crud

Asymmetrical (left & right skis)

Featuring a well-rounded profile, quick edge-to-edge transitions, and maneuverability, the Elan Ripstick 96 is here to rip. These playful, lightweight skis are a great one-ski quiver for bumps, tree skiing, and low-end powder.

The Elan Ripsticks don't handle crud well. Crud is an uneven and bumpy snow surface that, unfortunately, knocks lightweight skis like the Ripstick around. However, if you’re like me and value playfulness, carving capabilities, and a lightweight profile, the Ripstick is a solid choice.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 164, 172, 180, 188 cm
  • Tip width: 136mm– 
  • Waist width: 96mm–
  • Tail width: 110mm–
  • Turning radius: Medium (17-22 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Elan Ripstick 96

Head Kore 93

Best All Mountain Skis for Intermediate Skiers

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Head Kore 93
Pros

Lightweight

Maneuverable

Smooth at speeds

Decent flotation in softer snow

Can grow with you

Cons

Very bouncy in crud

Can’t handle deep powder

The Head Kore 93 skis are a dependable, popular, and lighter-weight all-mountain option for intermediate skiers. The Kore 93s have high maneuverability due to a short turning radius, are smooth at speeds, and provide decent float in moderate powder and soft snow conditions.

Like a few previous entries, the lightweight construction has trouble handling crud. Additionally, the width means they won’t deal with deep powder well.

However, for the vast majority of skiers, the Head Kore 93 can act as an effective quiver of one, handling whatever type of terrain the mountain gives you.

Technical Details

  • Ski lengths: 153, 162, 171, 180, 189 cm 
  • Tip width: 133mm–
  • Waist width: 93mm–
  • Tail width: 115mm–
  • Turning radius: Short (~16 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Rocker/Camber/Rocker

Head Kore 93

Fischer Ranger 102

Best All Mountain Skis for Advanced Skiers

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Fischer Ranger 102
Pros

A high-quality option for experienced skiers

Responsive and versatile

Great in the bumps

Fun in softer conditions

Great for most inbounds terrain

Cons

Relatively heavy and harder to handle

I love these skis. They're a great all-mountain daily driver for advanced skill levels. The fantastic responsiveness on a wide range of ski terrain is a delight, and the skis are lots of fun in moderate powder.

The downside to the Fischer Ranger 102s is that they're relatively heavy; however, there's a hidden advantage. The weight makes these skis one of the best crud busters out there.

A ski that’s fun in the powder, choppy snow, bumps, and trees, and can handle crud, should be on everyone's radar.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 155, 162, 169, 176, 183, 190 cm
  • Tip width: 135, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 mm
  • Waist width: 100, 101, 102, 103, 104 mm
  • Tail width: 125, 126, 127, 128, 129 mm
  • Turning radius: Medium (18 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Fischer Ranger 102

Line Blade Optic 104s

Most Versatile All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Line Blade Optic 104s
Pros

Fun and versatile

Easy to carve with

Handles powder well

Excellent edge control on ice

Crud buster

Cons

Chattery at high speeds

A bit heavier than other models

This extremely versatile pair of All Mountain skis is one of my favorites. You can carve easily, handle a decent amount of powder, and the skis have excellent grip on harder snow surfaces like icy groomers. The Line Blade Optic 104s are a really enjoyable pair of skis for the entire mountain.

The skis do chatter at high speeds; it isn't enough to impact your performance, but it will happen. Compared to others, the Blade Optic 104s are also a little on the heavy side. 

But for their versatility, performance, and fun factor, these skis will appeal to a broad range of skiing styles.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 171, 178, 185, 190 cm
  • Tip width: 132mm–
  • Waist width: 104mm–
  • Tail width: 123mm–
  • Turning radius: Medium (19 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Line Blade Optic 104s

Salomon QST 106

Best All Mountain Wide Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Salomon QST 106
Pros

Fantastic powder performance

Unisex appeal

Dependable on groomed snow

Easy to maneuver

Solid performance in the bumps and trees

Cons

Less stable over rough/bumpy snow

The Salomon QST 106s are incredibly maneuverable, powder-leaning all-mountain skis. They’re an absolute delight in fresh snow. The skis are also dependable in groomed terrain and offer consistently high performance in bumps and trees.

The QSTs are good skis but get knocked around in the crud quite a bit. They’re also not the fastest skis out there. However, if you anticipate skiing in soft conditions often, either fresh powder or packed powder, a pair of Salomon QST 106s is an excellent choice.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 157, 165, 173, 181, 189 cm
  • Tip width: 136, 137, 138, 139, 140 mm
  • Waist width: 106mm—
  • Tail width: 123, 124, 125, 126, 127 mm
  • Turning radius: Medium (16-20 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Salomon QST 106

Nordica Enforcer 94

Best Frontside All Mountain Skis

My winner
Best All Mountain Skis - Nordica Enforcer 94
Pros

Precision carving ski

Holds an edge well

Dependable in most conditions

Good hardpack performance

Cons

Not great for medium to deep powder

The front side refers to the area of a ski resort closest to the base area. If you love frontside groomers, bumps, and steeps, these groomer-leaning all-mountain skis are for you. The Nordica Enforcer 94s have brilliant carving ability, hold an edge well, and are dependable across the board. 

While the Nordica Enforcer 94s can handle low-end powder, they have a hard time staying afloat on deep snow days. Having said that, in the vast majority of conditions, the skis can hold their own. 

Every time I ski with the Enforcer 94s, I have a good time.

Technical Details

  • Ski length: 165, 172, 179, 186, 191cm
  • Tip width: 125.5, 126.5, 127, 127.5, 128mm
  • Tail length: 112.5, 114.5, 115.5, 115.5, 116mm
  • Waist width: 94mm–
  • Turning radius: Medium (~17 meters)
  • Ski Profile: Tip Rocker/ Camber/ Tail Rocker

Nordica Enforcer 94

Pros
Cons

Verdict:

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All Mountain Ski Buying Guide

Most skiers dream of deep powder, free refills, an uncrowded liftline (or wide swaths of empty backcountry terrain), and endless enjoyment. This mindset means we often buy the most idealistic instead of the most realistic options.

Use the points below to analyze all relevant factors so you can find the perfect ski for you. Buying a pair of skis, whether it’s your first or tenth time, is a big deal, and we want to make sure you get the best one.

Price

New skis are expensive. You’re looking at probably $600-$700 for a mid-range and over $1,000 for the pricier models. Discount skis can hover in the $300-$500 range. As the central purchase of a budding skiing career, it’s a tough but often necessary pill to swallow. 

Skis aren’t the only thing you need to buy either. A proper kit requires helmets, goggles, bindings, and boots, so watching the budget is a good move.

Geography

What types of snow conditions does your preferred resort experience most? For resorts with lots of powder, you can use wider, floppier skis without layers of metal. However, if you ski at an area with frequent wind, high humidity, freezing rain, and hardpack, it’s best to get a stiffer, heavier ski with metal edges that can carve. 

Width & Length

All mountain skis fit between the skinnier racing skis and wider powder skis. The width is measured under the bindings, which is the thinnest part of the ski. This is often referred to as millimeters underfoot. 

Leading all-mountain skis typically run from 80-104mm wide, with a couple of exceptions on either side. Thinner skis are usually easier to tip onto the edges for carving, while wider skis tend to float better in softer conditions.

Ski length corresponds to skier height. Measure yourself in cm from head to toe. Then, measure yourself from the top of your shoulder to your toes. A correct ski length for you is somewhere between those two measurements.

Within that range, longer skis will be more stable but require more energy to control. Shorter skis will turn easily, useful in bumps and tight trees, but offer less control at high speeds.

Camber/Rocker Profile

These terms refer to the profile of your ski. Place a ski on a flat surface. Then, step back a few feet, get on the same level and look at the ski from the side.

If there are upward bends at the tip and/or tail, that's a rocker profile, also called reverse camber. A rocker profile helps skis stay afloat in powder. The downside of rocker profiles is less carving capability.

If the middle of the ski has an upward bend beneath the bindings, that’s camber. For carving purposes, a traditional camber profile helps propel you into the next turn by acting like a spring. As you compress your body and put pressure on your skis, the camber flattens. Then, as you extend out of a turn, the camber profile pops you up faster.

In some ski descriptions, you’ll encounter the phrase effective edge. This simply means the amount of ski that touches the ground when you're in your bindings. Unusually large traditional cambers or a pronounced rocker reduces the effective edge.

Sidecut/Turn Radius

Skis are not straight lines, the tip is the widest part, followed by the tail. The skinniest part is in the middle, also called the waist width. The sidecut is the combination of these three width measurements (tip, waist, and tail). 

Because of the hourglass shape created (wide-thin-wide), if you tip your skis onto their edges, the skis will make a turn without you trying. How large that turn ends up is the turn radius. In general, beginners want a shorter turn radius (10-15 meters) because it helps to encourage turning.

Stiffness/Flex

This category is about ski design. A softer flex will make it easier to bend the ski but floppy skis don’t feel as stable at speed. A ski with a rigid design takes more energy to bend and usually has a few sheets of metal woven into the construction. Once you do bend it, however, you get a lot of control and power out of the rigid design.

Stiffer skis tend to work better in challenging conditions like ice and crud and often demand aggressive skiers to master. Flexible skis are great for the terrain park, bumps, trees, and softer snow.

Summary

For advanced skiers, the Nordica Enforcer 100s, Fischer Ranger 102’s, and Volkl Mantra M6s are the best all-mountain skis. If you know you’ll be skiing in soft snow conditions, the Salomon QST 106 or Blade Optics 104 are fun and reliable.

If you’re looking for the best women’s all-mountain skis, it’s hard to go wrong with the Santa Ana 98’s. Additionally, if you’re a beginner or on a tight budget, grabbing a pair of K2 Mindbenders or an Elan Ripstick will set you up for long-term success without destroying your wallet.

Common questions

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I’m happiest on long backpacking trips into little-known pockets of wilderness, skiing down backcountry mountains, and on all-fours, scrambling the rocky spines of alpine ridges. When I'm not adventuring in the outdoors, I'm most likely writing about them.

*The information on this site is based on research and first-hand experience but should not be treated as medical advice. Before beginning any new activity, we recommend consulting with a physician, nutritionist or other relevant professional healthcare provider.

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