The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022

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The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022

Finding the right ski boots is no small task. Ski boot shells are made of hard plastic that doesn't break in like other materials. So if you have wide feet, you need to find a boot made to fit you. 

In this article, I've compiled the best wide ski boots in every discipline of alpine skiing. So whatever your flavor is, you can find the best pair to keep your feet comfortable while you ski. Below is a preview of my top 3 and further down is the full list.

Top 3 Wide Ski Boots Preview

What Are Wide Fit Ski Boots?

Because ski boots have a hard plastic shell, they don't break in like other boots. Where people with wide feet may be able to get away with a broken-in pair of normal hikers, narrow ski boots will be a serious pain for people with wide feet.

The measurement that defines a ski boot's width is the last. This is the width of the boot at the ball of the foot. Average-sized feet have a last around 100 millimeters.

Narrow boots have a last under 99mm. Medium-wide boots range from 101 to 103mm. Wide feet, and therefore wide boots, exceed 103mm.

How Do I Know If I Need Wide Ski Boots?

If you're wearing narrow ski boots, it doesn't take long to find out that your foot is too wide. People with a wide last will be in a lot of pain in a narrow boot.

If you're starting out skiing and renting, the rental technician should put your foot in a Brannock device. This will measure your foot's length and last to find a boot that's right for your foot. Once you know your last and size, finding the right pair of boots will be a lot easier.

Our Review Process

In my 24 years of skiing, I've struggled time and time again to find the perfect pair of boots. As a person with wide feet, I had to learn everything I know about ski boots the hard way.

But in the process, I've tried just about every boot on the market. I'm pleased to bring that expertise to you, to save you some sore feet and help you find your perfect fit.

This guide contains the best ski boots available for people with wide feet, regardless of which discipline you practice. It also contains some tips on how to shop smart.

Wide Ski Boot Reviews - Full List

K2 BFC 100 Ski Boots

Best All-Around Wide Ski Boots

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - K2 BFC 100 Ski Boots
Pros

Versatile

Comfortable

Moldable shells

Moderate flex

Walk mode

Inexpensive

Cons

Not very stiff

No tech binding compatibility

If you're just getting started skiing and want something that you can grow into, the K2 BFC is ideal. The name says it all: BFC stands for "Built For Comfort." This focus on comfort is especially true for skiers with wide feet.

The BFC features a 103mm last and moldable shells and liners, for even more fit customization. They're a moderate 100 flex level, which is perfect for beginners and intermediate skiers looking to step their game up. They also have a walk mode, a plus if you're starting out backcountry skiing as well.

But expert skiers will want something stiffer. The BFCs are also not compatible with tech bindings, so you'll have to use frame bindings for touring.

K2 BFC 100 Ski Boots

Dalbello DS MX 75 Ski Boots

Best Inexpensive Wide Boots for Beginner Skiers

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - Dalbello DS MX 75 Ski Boots
Pros

Forgiving flex

Wide last

Very inexpensive

Beginner-friendly

Cons

Not aggressive enough for off piste

No touring features

Putting together ski gear can get expensive fast. If you're just starting out and don't want to spend a lot of money yet, Dalbello has a wide boot for you.

Dalbello created the DS MX 75 with beginners in mind. It's a simple design for downhill use with soft flex rating. The last is an accommodating 105mm, making them the ideal wide boot option for beginners. Best of all, they're dirt cheap.

However, if you're trying to venture off piste or out of the resort, the DS MX will not cut it. These boots are strictly for groomer skiing in bounds. Advanced skiers will want something stiffer with more lean angle.

Dalbello DS MX 75 Ski Boots

Full Tilt Descendant 100 Ski Boots

Best Wide Freestyle Ski Boots

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - Full Tilt Descendant 100 Ski Boots
Pros

Great performance in bounds

Mid-wide fit

Moldable Intuition liners

Solid flex for freestyle skiing

Reasonable price

Cons

Poor touring performance

Heavy

If you're fully committed to skiing in the resort with style, go Full Tilt. The Full Tilt Descendant 100 is a rock solid medium-wide fit boot for freestyle skiers.

The Descendant 100 uses a progressive flex, 102mm last, and Intuition liners. Intuition makes the most high performance liner on the market for comfort and keeping your feet warm.

The Descendants are forgiving enough for riding out big airs and rail slides, without sacrificing performance off piste. Full Tilt also makes great boots for women, offering more choices to resort skiers.

But they won't perform very well out of bounds. They're heavy, have no walk mode, and the three buckle design is less ergonomic for touring.

Full Tilt Descendant 100 Ski Boots

Atomic Hawx Magna 120s Ski Boots

Best Wide Ski Boots for Experienced Skiers

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - Atomic Hawx Magna 120s Ski Boots
Pros

Comfortable

Stiff flex for all-mountain freeskiing

Warm

Medium-wide last

Solid construction

Moldable shells and liners

Cons

Booster straps poorly made

No walk mode

Heavy

After years of trial and error, I've found my perfect fit in the Atomic Magna Prime 120s. These are my daily drivers for resort skiing and short tours out of bounds. 

Though the Magna Prime is on the low end of medium wide at 102mm, the moldable shells and liners allow you to get some extra room. They have a stiff flex rating for aggressive downhill performance.

Atomic boots use a frictionless pivot, similar to Salmon's oversized pivot for better power transfer. I also like the adjustable buckles, and the way they fit in the calf region. The liners are comfortable and warm for long days on the mountain.

My two dislikes about the Magna Prime are the lack of a walk mode and the weakness of the power straps. After a season of use, one power strap ripped off completely while tightening it. Be prepared to upgrade them with Booster Straps for a better fit.

Atomic Hawx Magna 120s Ski Boots

Dynafit Hoji Free 130 Backcountry Touring Boots

Best Wide Backcountry Touring Ski Boots

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - Dynafit Hoji Free 130 Backcountry Touring Boots
Pros

Balanced uphill and downhill performance

Stiff flex rating

Walk mode

Medium-wide last

Crampon compatible

Pin binding compatible

Cons

Expensive

Finding the right downhill boot is hard enough. Finding something wide that will also perform out of bounds reduces your options by a lot. Luckily the Dynafit's Eric Hjorleifson pro line has a great option for backcountry skiers with wide feet.

The Dynafit Hoji Free 130 is everything a dedicated backcountry skier could want. They're light enough to go uphill with ease but burly enough to handle big downhill lines.

With crampon and pin binding compatibility, and a 102mm last, the Hoji Free is one of the most technical wide boots on the market. For more comfort, they feature an adjustable cuff profile and awesome range of motion.

The price you pay for all this technical performance is, well, the price. The Hoji Free is one of the most expensive ski boots on this list.

Dynafit Hoji Free 130 Backcountry Touring Boots

Scarpa TX Pro Telemark Boots

Best Wide Telemark Ski Boots

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - Scarpa TX Pro Telemark Boots
Pros

Awesome telemark and touring performance

Steep forward lean angle

"No duckbill" design for better boot packing

110 flex

Comfortable

Cons

No moldable shells

Medium-wide last

Tele skiers can have wide feet too! As always, Scarpa has thought of everything with the TX Pro Telemark Boot.

The Scarpa TX Pro offers balanced telemark and touring performance. They feature pin and tele binding compatibility. The shells are triple injection-molded for seamless power transfer while skiing. With 102mm lasts and a 110 flex rating, the TX Pro can handle about anything.

But the TX Pro isn't the most wide forefoot on this list. For moldable boots, this isn't much of an issue, but the TX Pro is not a moldable boot. So if your last is more than 102 or 103mm, you will want to find wider ski boots.

Scarpa TX Pro Telemark Boots

La Sportiva Stratos V Alpine Ski Mountaineering Boots

Best Wide Ski Mountaineering Boots

My winner
The 7 Best Ski Boots for Wide Feet in 2022 - La Sportiva Stratos V Alpine Ski Mountaineering Boots
Pros

Ultralight

Amazing uphill performance

Wide last

Strong materials

Good waterproofing

Cons

Not very warm

Very expensive

Much less support for ankles

If you've been reading up to this point and thinking "none of these boots can handle what I like doing," don't fret. The La Sportiva Stratos V Alpine boot is one of the most high tech boots ever created for skiers like you.

Made with ski mountaineering racers in mind, the Stratos V offers ultralight performance for the alpine. La Sportiva has stripped away every piece of non-essential material to achieve a net weight of 510 grams each.

Despite being so light, they're still very waterproof and stiff enough to handle the descent. With a cozy 103.8mm last, they're more than accommodating for ski mountaineers with wider feet.

But space-age tech is very expensive. This is by far the most expensive boot on this list. They also serve a single purpose. Don't expect amazing downhill performance or even alpine binding compatibility. The lack of shell will also not do as good of a job at keeping your feet warm.

La Sportiva Stratos V Alpine Ski Mountaineering Boots

Pros
Cons

Verdict:

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How to Shop For A Pair of Ski Boots

Once you dive in, you'll realize that there are a ton of options for ski boots. Finding the perfect pair for your feet is tough. Here are some things to look for while shopping so you can narrow the options down.

Cost

The price of a pair of ski boots depends on a few things. One is how aggressive the flex of the boots is. Another is how technical the boots are. Adding a walk mode, pin binding compatibility, and higher stiffness will increase the cost.

In general, downhill boots range from $200-$600. Backcountry touring boots often range from $600-$1100. Ski mountaineering-specific boots are the most expensive, often priced well over $1000.

Fit

Fit is the most important part of your ski boot purchase. You want ski boots that mold to your feet perfectly, without cutting off blood circulation. When you find the right fit, they will feel too tight the first few times you use them.

But as your new boots break in or "pack out," they will become roomier. For wide boots, the best way to find the right pair is to learn your last size and then find a boot with a matching last.

Some boots like the Atomic Hawx Prime are also made to accommodate a higher instep. Other boots have higher or lower arches, narrow or wide forefoot (or toe box), and different calf shapes.

So there’s a lot more to finding comfortable ski boots than just the right boot size. Heat molding will adjust some of these measurements more than others. For example, wide calves are easy to work around through molding, where foot length (boot size) is not.

Discipline

Are you skiing only at the resort? In the backcountry? Are you more focused on the uphill than the downhill?

These are all questions you need to think about. Downhill boots have the fewest features, and are the heaviest. Touring boots are lighter, and have a release-able "walk mode" for moving uphill. They also often have divots in the toe piece to conform with technical pin bindings.

Stiffness

Usually, if you're going faster, you want a stiffer boot. Stiff boots let you lean forward harder while supporting your weight. Heavier skiers will also prefer stiffer boots. Freestyle boots are the exception to this rule. Many freestyle or park skiers prefer a softer, more forgiving boot flex.

Flex ratings are measured on a scale of 0-130, with 130 being the stiffest. But flex ratings vary between brands.

That is to say, an Atomic boot with a flex rating of 120 may be softer than a Dynafit with a 120 flex. It's not a hard metric for comparing boots, but more of a rough reference of how stiff or flexible a boot is.

Reputable Ski Boot Brands

There are many brands that make ski boots. Some brands stick to certain disciplines within skiing. For example, Full Tilt is primarily a freestyle boot company. La Sportiva and Scarpa make boots for touring and ski mountaineering.

Others like Dynafit, K2, Nordica, Lange, Dalbello, Atomic, and Salomon make lots of different kinds of boots. All these brands are reputable and make high-quality boots.

Working With A Boot Fitter

You should not buy boots based entirely on what you see online. Finding the right fit takes too much tweaking to get right without trying them on. So when in doubt, go to your local ski shop and talk to a boot fitter.

Boot fitters can help you find a boot with a fit that works. They can also mold your boot's liners and shells to dial the fit even further.

Summary 

We find the best pair of wide ski boots for beginners and intermediates is the K2 BFC 100.

The best wide boot for aggressive downhill skiing is the Atomic Hawx Prime.

For ski touring, the Dynafit Hoji Free 130 is the best wide boot.

For beginners with wide feet on a budget, the Dalbello DS MX 75 is the best.

Common questions

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I consider myself a citizen of the West. Currently residing in my hometown, Salt Lake City, Utah. Between my career as a wildlife biologist and my many outdoor hobbies (mountaineering, skiing, backpacking, climbing, canyoneering, caving), I’ve seen just about every nook and cranny of the Wild, Weird West.

*The information on this site is based on research and first-hand experience but should not be treated as medical advice. Before beginning any new activity, we recommend consulting with a physician, nutritionist or other relevant professional healthcare provider.

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