7 Best Ski Boot Dryers For 2022

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7 Best Ski Boot Dryers For 2022

Let’s face it: no one likes stinky ski boots. Having boots that stay wet for days after your trip is a sure way to make them smell.

The simplest solution is to invest in a ski boot dryer. While that might seem like a luxury to some, a boot dryer can make it much easier to dry out your gear quickly and keep it from getting moldy. In the long run, having a ski boot dryer can even save you money by making your gear last longer.

In this guide, I’ll show you the 7 best boot dryers you can use to dry your gear after your next trip to the mountains.

Our Review Process

I began skiing 25 years ago and have been a ski instructor for seven of those. In that time, I’ve come to know the ins and outs of skiing quite well and am happy to share the knowledge I’ve accrued with you.

I ski up to 140 days a season, so having a way to dry out my boots quickly is absolutely essential. I’ve found the best boot dryers available today, and I’m here to share my experience and help you avoid stinky, wet ski boots. For this guide, I rated boot dryers on drying time, power, ease of use, price, and portability.

DryGuy 2207 Force Dry Boot Dryer

Best Overall Ski Boot Dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - DryGuy 2207 Force Dry Boot Dryer
Pros

Excellent airflow

Low weight (3 lbs.)

Dries fast (1-2 hours for boots)

Simple to use

Cons

Low capacity

I think this is the best overall ski boot dryer out there. DryGuy has built a reputation for superior boot dryers, and this model stands up to even the most challenging conditions.

The heat hovers at a gentle yet effective 105 degrees Fahrenheit, and there’s an automatic shut-off so you can set a time and leave it to finish the cycle without worrying. The ports are adjustable and have extenders to get into the deepest parts of your boots. The setup is so small that it even fits into a backpack, which is another plus. Overall, it’s lightweight, easy to use, and dries boots quickly.

The only downside I found to the DryGuy 2207 is that it only has capacity for one pair of boots. So, it’s really best for solo skiers.

DryGuy 2207 Force Dry Boot Dryer

PEET, Multi Electric, and Boot Dryer w/ Glove Dry Ports

Best Ski Boot and Glove Dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - PEET, Multi Electric, and Boot Dryer w/ Glove Dry Ports
Pros

Dries quickly and quietly

Glove attachments

Low electricity consumption

Can dry multiple pieces of equipment

25-year warranty

Cons

Pricey for its capacity

I love this dryer because of its specific glove attachments. Capable of handling either two pairs of boots at a time or boots and a pair of gloves, the increased capacity helps speed up the drying process for all your gear. The dryer is also really quiet and uses a low amount of electricity. Plus, PEET has a stellar 25-year warranty. 

While not the most expensive unit out there, the PEET Multi Electric Boot Dryer with Glove Ports is not the cheapest. Unfortunately, the useful deodorizer/odor eliminator attachment isn’t included with the dryer.

PEET, Multi Electric, and Boot Dryer w/ Glove Dry Ports

Gear Dryer Wall Mount 12 Dryer

Best wall-mounted ski boot dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - Gear Dryer Wall Mount 12 Dryer
Pros

High capacity

Mounting hardware included

Easy to use

Multiple modes

Cons

Price

Heavy for installation (46 lbs.)

If your family skis hard and skis often, the Gear Dryer Wall Mount 12 is for you. I’ve used this model many times and am always satisfied with the results. In addition to quick and efficient boot drying, this dryer boasts capacity for 6 pairs of boots - or gloves, socks, and any other gear you need to dry. The setup comes with all the mounting hardware you need, and the dryer is easy to learn and operate.

The downsides to this wall-mounted dryer is the lack of portability, the weight of the unit, and its overall price. Still, if you’re after a heavy-duty dryer, I think this is a great option.

Gear Dryer Wall Mount 12 Dryer

DryGuy Travel Dry DX Boot Dryer

Best Portable Ski Boot Dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - DryGuy Travel Dry DX Boot Dryer
Pros

Portable

Dries in 2-5 hours

Power adapter for car charging

Affordable

Cons

Low capacity

There is a surprising number of portable ski boot dryers, with a number of interesting products that offer reliable results. My choice for the best portable model is the DryGuy Travel Dry DX. This dryer is compact, weighs next to nothing, has an adapter for car charging, and is very affordable.

The low capacity is the most obvious downside. But for a portable ski boot dryer, the DryGuy Travel Dry DX does everything you need it to.

DryGuy Travel Dry DX Boot Dryer

DryGuy DX Forced Air Boot Dryer

Best Ski Boot Dryer for Two People

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - DryGuy DX Forced Air Boot Dryer
Pros

Relatively quiet

Stable setup

Easy to use

Set and forget with the timer

Cons

4-5 hours to dry

Timer knob is tough to turn

Like the DryGuy 2207, this is an incredibly easy-to-use and efficient boot dryer that I use frequently throughout my ski instructing season.

The long attachments are great for ski boots, and while the unit does make noise, it isn’t overpowering or distracting. The whole setup is stable, even with two pairs of heavy boots hanging off the attachments, and it could hardly be easier to use. Just turn the knob, set it, and forget it.

One thing to note is that very wet boots will need two or three cycles to dry completely. In those cases, the best thing to do is get the dryer started right after you finish skiing so that your boots will be ready the following day.

DryGuy DX Forced Air Boot Dryer

Drysure Extreme Boot Dryer

Best Non-Electric Boot Dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - Drysure Extreme Boot Dryer
Pros

No plug needed

Great design 

Dries well

Unique drying tech

Cons

Slow drying time

Light maintenance

Electric ski boot dryers are the fastest way to dry your footwear, but they can suck up power and make a lot of noise. I really enjoyed trying out the DrySure Extreme Boot Dryer because it’s so different, relying on Silica oxide beads to pull moisture out of your boot. No noise, no plug-ins, no timer settings—just slip the dryer into your boot. 

The dry time is slower—think 8-10 hours or longer for very wet boots—so it isn’t the most convenient option for frequent skiers expecting a speedy turnaround time. There’s also a bit of light maintenance required. After 7-10 uses, you have to open the dryer, take out the bag housing the silica beads, and lay it in the sun or stick it in the oven for a few minutes.

Drysure Extreme Boot Dryer

Kooder Portable Boot Dryer and Sanitizer

Best Budget Ski Boot Dryer

My winner
7 Best Ski Boot Dryers - Kooder Portable Boot Dryer and Sanitizer
Pros

Cheap

Portable

Dries overnight

Easy to use

Cons

Slow dry time

Short cord

Kooder isn’t a big name in the boot drying game. But after using this dryer, I was impressed with its ability to suck out moisture. It’s cheap enough for almost anyone to afford, as well as small and portable. It even works in cars with a power adapter for skiers on the go.

The Kooder needs roughly 8-10 hours to dry fairly moist boots. If your ski boots are absolutely soaked, plan on a full day or longer. The time component is a bit of a drag, but that’s the tradeoff you make for a rock-bottom price.

Kooder Portable Boot Dryer and Sanitizer

Pros
Cons

Verdict:

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How to Dry Ski Boots Without a Dryer 

For some of us, a ski boot dryer just isn’t in the cards. Luckily, there are many DIY ways to dry a boot.

After you ski, take your liners out of your boot. Separating the two components helps eliminate nooks and crannies where moisture can hide. Then, if you have a porch or outside space that sees a lot of sun, position both the liners there.

If it’s the dead of winter and freezing outside, you can use a fireplace. Again, separate your liners and the boot, and then stick the liners a few feet back from the fire. Closer may dry them faster, but it can also crack and break the materials of the liner. Remember never to put the plastic shell near a heat source, only the liners.

In a pinch, a blow-dryer can be used to get deeper into the liners. Another less invasive option is to bunch up dryer sheets and shove them into your boots. Leaving them for a minimum of two days is recommended, so all excess moisture is absorbed.

Finally, if you’re all out of dryer sheets, there’s always rice. You can pour rice into a sock, tie it, slip it into your boot and leave it. You can also submerge a moisture-laden liner in a ton of rice and check on it every few hours until it’s dry.

While all of these options do work, a boot heater is by far the fastest and simplest way to dry out your boots.

5 Tips for Keeping Your Ski Boots Dry

After a long day of skiing, it’s tempting to shove all your gear in a corner and deal with it later. Try to resist this urge. If you want your ski boots to last as long as possible, it’s important to make drying out your ski boots a part of your routine right after you come home from a day on the slopes.

  • Get a head start by using a portable heater for the drive home.
  • When you get home, remove the liner from the boot and put it in a warm, dry place.
  • If the liners are still moist, use a boot dryer, the sun, dryer sheets, or air dry them until they are dry.
  • Wipe down the plastic shell, making sure to focus on clearing any excess moisture, dirt, and grime. Unlike the liner, avoid sticking the plastic shell in direct sunlight or near a heat source as it could warp or melt the plastic.
  • Once the liners are dry, reinsert them into the outer plastic. Then, re-buckle the boots to retain their shape. Plastic is malleable, and if you don’t retain the shape of the boot, it will degrade faster. Finally, store your ski boots upright and in a dry environment like a closet, boot bag, or temperature-controlled room.

Remember: proper maintenance keeps your equipment functioning for much longer.

Summary

The best overall ski boot dryer for the money is the DryGuy 2207. I recommend this model because it’s quick to dry, adjustable, light, and super easy to use.

If you’re more interested in budget options, the Kooder Portable Boot Dryer, PEET Dryer – Go!, and DryGuy Travel Dry DX are fantastic portable dryers that’ll save you space and money. For larger families, the Gear Dryer Wall Mount 12 Dryer can accommodate up to six boots at once and delivers consistently dry results.

Common questions

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I’m happiest on long backpacking trips into little-known pockets of wilderness, skiing down backcountry mountains, and on all-fours, scrambling the rocky spines of alpine ridges. When I'm not adventuring in the outdoors, I'm most likely writing about them.

*The information on this site is based on research and first-hand experience but should not be treated as medical advice. Before beginning any new activity, we recommend consulting with a physician, nutritionist or other relevant professional healthcare provider.

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