9 Best Hiking Belts in 2022

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9 Best Hiking Belts in 2022

Having your hiking pants fall down while engaging in outdoor activities can be really dangerous. Imagine scrambling, mountaineering or backpacking, only to have your pants fall down, leading to potential slips, trips, and falls. If you’re hiking in a group, it can also be embarrassing.

A hiking belt helps keep your pants in place, making it safer to hike and preventing any awkward moments. In this guide, I’ll walk through the 9 best hiking belts from the rugged to the lightweight. Keep your pants and your ego up with one of the durable and dependable belts below.

Our Review Process

Hiking belts serve multiple purposes. Not only is it embarrassing to have pants drop off your hips, but it also creates a tripping hazard. A poorly performing belt will hamper your ability to haul outdoor gear, limit your freedom of movement, and can make it impossible to utilize pants pockets.

With a good hiking belt, you'll be able to keep everything in place and maximize the use of your outdoor clothing. The best hiking belts are lightweight, easy to work with, and don’t inhibit mobility. I’ll look at the top belts, their features and how they add value to your hiking setup.

Arc’Teryx Conveyor Belt

Best Overall Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Arc’Teryx Conveyor Belt
Pros

Durable

Flexible/stretchy material

Fits most people well

Many sizes and lengths

Versatile

Cons

Adjustments necessary

Can press against backpack waist belt

Typical of Arc’Teryx, this quality nylon belt marries style with functionality. Not only is it a great-looking belt, but it’s also durable, stretches well, comes in many sizes and fits most people. The versatility, style and functionality make the Arc’Teryx Conveyor Belt my pick for the best overall hiking belt of 2022.

On the negative side, the belt buckle is a bit larger than it needs to be and you can feel it press against your backpack’s waist strap. The belt will also need occasional adjustment as you walk, but the easy threading makes it a quick fix.

Affordable, durable and with a great look to boot, if you want a solid belt that can do it all, the Arc’teryx Conveyor Belt is my top pick.

Arc’Teryx Conveyor Belt

GRIP6 Horizon Granite Belt

Best Lightweight Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - GRIP6 Horizon Granite Belt
Pros

Incredibly lightweight (12 grams)

Phenomenal lifetime guarantee

Sturdy stretch belt

True to size

Cons

Pricey for a minimalist belt

Tougher to cinch

The GRIP6 Horizon Granite Belt is ridiculously lightweight—so lightweight that you may forget you’re wearing it. This is a sturdy stretch belt that generally runs true to size. It’s handy for long days on the trail and promises an unlimited lifetime guarantee for replacement.

Given its lightweight design, it makes sense that the belt is made of only nylon and a fixed buckle. It's a bit disappointing, though, to have such a high price tag for just these two components. I like the belt and can see the value, but I wish the price was lower.

Despite the price, I like the Grip 6 Horizon Granite Belt for its simple design and highly effective structure. Many other belts run below this price point, but if you want simple, lightweight and long-lasting, this is a solid choice.

GRIP6 Horizon Granite Belt

Black Diamond Diamond Mine

Best Belt for Backpacking

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Black Diamond Diamond Mine
Pros

Durable

Stretch belt

Buckle lies flat

Easy adjustments

Good price point

Cons

Long break-in period

Sizing runs large

The Black Diamond Diamond Mine Belt is my pick for the best backpacking belt. The belt material is durable, lightweight and stretchy, and adjustments come easy. On top of all that, the solid buckle, while larger, lies flat across your waistline, which means it won’t bunch or catch on a backpack hip belt. The material is strong and the belt can hold lots of weight.

There are two small issues with this otherwise stellar product. The break-in period is long—think 1-2 months of consistent wear. It ends up fitting like a glove, but this belt isn’t ready for the backcountry right away. Another issue is the sizing, which seems to run large, and the excess belt is a pain to either stuff away or shorten yourself.

Black Diamond Diamond Mine

Arcade Ranger Slim

Best Women’s Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Arcade Ranger Slim
Pros

Narrow width

Versatile

Stretchy

Comfortable

Lightweight

Cons

Difficult to adjust

Weaker buckle

The Arcade Ranger Slim outdoor belt is durable and stretchy. The buckle is plastic, so it's a great travel belt and a good option for people with metal allergies. Thanks to its comfort, style, durability and narrow width, the Arcade Ranger Slim is my pick for the best women’s hiking belt.

Despite its stretchiness, this belt can be difficult to adjust. This won't be an issue for many, but it can be a problem for larger and smaller individuals. Additionally, while the plastic buckle didn't show any signs of wear and tear after multiple uses, it is likely to be weaker than a metal buckle.

Arcade Ranger Slim

Fairwin Ratchet Hiking Belt

Best Heavy-Duty Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Fairwin Ratchet Hiking Belt
Pros

Highly adjustable

Works for many body types

Durable

Comfortable

Won’t loosen over time

Cons

Heavier

Buckle paint scratches off

For heavy-duty outdoor jobs, treks, summits, hiking trips and more, my favorite belt is the Fairwin Ratchet Hiking Belt. This is a sturdy, highly adjustable and versatile belt that, when cinched tight using the ratchet system, won’t loosen over time. It’s also comfortable to wear.

For serious backpackers, long-distance hikers and outdoor folk, the weight is a bit heavier than other belts on this list. Additionally, while the look is initially quite striking, the buckle paint scratches off easily.

Fairwin Ratchet Hiking Belt

Columbia Men’s Military-Style Web Belt

Best Budget Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Columbia Men’s Military-Style Web Belt
Pros

Low price

Good stretch

Reliable fit

Multi-purpose look

Cons

Not for all body sizes

Not as durable

The Columbia Men’s Military Style Web Belt is my pick for the best budget hiking belt. This is one of the cheapest belts on the market, has a good amount of stretch, and is a reliable fit. The multi-purpose look makes it a great item to throw on for days around town in addition to using it in the backcountry.

This belt isn’t as durable as other belts I reviewed. While Columbia markets the belt as a one-size-fits-all model, it may not give the best fit for larger waist sizes and won’t hold as much weight as other belts. Still, for the money, this is a great buy.

Columbia Men’s Military-Style Web Belt

Klik Belts Tactical Belt

Best Tactical Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Klik Belts Tactical Belt
Pros

Durable material

Secure fit

Unique buckle system

Strong, can hold tactical gear

True to size and adjustable

Cons

Buckle may not fit through belt loops

Heavy

In the world of tactical hiking belts, few can do what the Klik Belts Tactical Belt can. This marvel of durability is composed of tough nylon material and has a unique, secure fit. This is a perfect belt for securing cell phone cases, hunting knives, concealed carry holsters, survival gear and an assortment of extras.

The buckle, while unique, is large and won’t fit through most narrower belt loops. You’ll have to unthread it from the loop and reattach it. The belt is also heavy and more expensive than other comparable belts. However, if you’re out in the wilderness and carrying multiple days of essential survival gear, this versatile belt performs well.

Klik Belts Tactical Belt

RattlerStrap Paracord Wilderness Belt

Best Hiking Survival Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - RattlerStrap Paracord Wilderness Belt
Pros

Durable

Paracord for emergencies

RattlerStrap replacement policy

Sturdy

Cons

Overkill for casual hiking

Price

In the wilderness survival world, the Rattlerstrap Paracord Wilderness Belt fits right in. Off-trail trekking, multi-day adventures and deep wilderness all come with added risks. In this belt, you have strength, durability, and 80 feet of paracord for emergencies. If you use the belt for its paracord, RattlerStrap will replace the belt for free, which is another nice plus.

For the majority of hikers, this belt may be overkill. It absolutely works, is tough and can help in a wilderness survival situation. But it’s not necessary for casual outdoor recreationists. Because of the tight paracord weave, the price of this belt is also a bit higher than that of other solid entries in this guide.

RattlerStrap Paracord Wilderness Belt

Main Street Forge the Bootlegger

Best Leather Hiking Belt

My winner
9 Best Hiking Belts - Main Street Forge the Bootlegger
Pros

Fine leather smell

Sturdy

Stylish

Good price point for leather

Cons

Heavier

Doesn’t sit as well with big packs

If you want the best all-leather belt for hiking, this is the one. The Bootlegger is a genuine leather belt that can hold a ton of weight, looks stylish and has a fair price. If you’re a fan of that leather smell, this model has it in spades. For casual hikes, chores, or milling around scenic overlooks, this is one of the best-looking belts out there.

This quality belt isn't heavy, but it's heavier than its hiking-specific competitors. The fit of the belt also ends up either digging into your belly with a big pack on or catches on your hip straps.

Main Street Forge the Bootlegger

Pros
Cons

Verdict:

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Hiking Belt Buying Guide

Given the wide range of hiking belts, if you're hunting for a new one, keep the following points in mind.

Type and Style

Hiking belts don't all fit into one category. For example, a hunter may not enjoy a lightweight budget belt that can’t hold a variety of hunting gear.

Similarly, an ultra-light athlete won't enjoy the weight and price of a proper tactical belt. Rugged belts are useful, but may be overkill for hikers looking for more casual belts.

Belts also come with color options and styles that may help you pick one over another. Outdoor belts can often be used for a wide range of situations like casual wear and formal attire. Style helps expand the versatility of the belt.

Price

The price range for outdoor belts is fairly wide. The cheapest belt options hover around $20. A good hiking belt has an average price of between $30-50 while supplying reliable performance.

On the more expensive side are tactical belts, which use hardier buckles and can carry significantly more weight. An average price for a proper rugged or tactical belt may cost between $80-100.

Material

Leather belts and belts with metal buckles tend to be heavier than belts that use plastic buckles on nylon webbing or polyester. However, leather also tends to be more durable.

People with a metal allergy should get a belt with a plastic buckle. Plastic buckles and non-metal buckles can also pass through metal detectors in airports, alleviating additional hassles when traveling.

Buckle Style

There are simple tongue buckles that work by threading through precut holes in the belt. There are hooked buckles that utilize a hook to hold the webbing in place.

There are also clamp closure buckles, flip closure buckles, sliding latch closures, clip belts, and military-style tactical buckles.

In all situations, the buckle is important for how it holds onto the webbing. Clips hold well but can occasionally break. Tongue belts rely on precut holes, and the holes will eventually stretch over time. Abrasion clamp belts rely on friction to hold a belt in place, which may slide depending on how tight the belt sits.

A buckle's performance can easily affect a purchasing decision since it is the one component holding the belt in place on your waist.

Weight

A versatile belt for outdoor use depends on lots of factors, but weight will always play a role. In cases of hardcore orienteering or survival camping, weight may be less important than the ability to carry multiple essential tools.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, long-distance backpackers, trail runners, hikers and adventurers may want a belt that’s as light as possible.

Length

Some belts run shorter than average, and some run longer. Generally speaking, unless otherwise indicated, it's better to err on the larger size. Unless the belt is pure leather, you can usually cut down excess belt webbing to fit you. If you order a belt that’s too small, there's not much you can do to salvage it.

When buying belts, make sure to hunt for sizing information and see if the belt runs true to size or skews larger or smaller.

Durability

There are fantastic and durable synthetic belts that weigh next to nothing. There are also heavier leather belts that don’t actually have the durability you’d expect.

If you pursue intense outdoor adventure, durability (for synthetic belts and leather belts) will make the difference between a belt that lasts one or two adventures and one that lasts for years.

Conclusion

Combining style, function and a lightweight profile, the Arc’Teryx Conveyor Belt is the best hiking belt for 2022. If you’re on a budget, the Columbia Men’s Military Style Webbing works well, as do the lightweight Grip 6 Horizon Granite Belt, Arcade Ranger Slim and the Black Diamond Diamond Mine.

For rugged travel and tactical purposes, the Fairwin Tactical Ratchet Hiking Belt and the Klik Belts Tactical Belts are fantastic. For the casual hiker who wants a great-looking leather belt, the Main Street Forge Bootlegger is a great option.

Common questions

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I’m happiest on long backpacking trips into little-known pockets of wilderness, skiing down backcountry mountains, and on all-fours, scrambling the rocky spines of alpine ridges. When I'm not adventuring in the outdoors, I'm most likely writing about them.

*The information on this site is based on research and first-hand experience but should not be treated as medical advice. Before beginning any new activity, we recommend consulting with a physician, nutritionist or other relevant professional healthcare provider.

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