5 Best Heated Ski Gloves

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5 Best Heated Ski Gloves

For many, cold fingers are a big concern. Particularly harsh winters are not only uncomfortable, but they can also lead to serious complications like frostnip or frostbite. While ski gloves do a good job at helping people retain heat, for those with poor circulation, sometimes more is needed.

Thankfully, there are heated ski gloves. The best-heated ski gloves help keep your fingers warm in extreme weather. With one of the best-heated ski gloves, you can enjoy cold smoke powder days while keeping your hands warm and happy. 

Our Review Process

I’ve spent the last quarter century skiing in a variety of places. Despite decent circulation and warm gear, some days on the slopes are just uncomfortably cold. In these situations, I’ve found that a heated ski glove can be the difference between enjoying an epic powder day and ending the day early because of frozen fingers.

There are many heated ski gloves out there, and I’ve tried dozens of them. I’m here to help you find one that will keep your cold hands warm during those frigid winter months.

Types of Heated Gloves

Heated gloves keep your hands toasty through either a chemical reaction or battery-powered warmth. The chemically activated options include hand warmer packets that you have to shake or expose to oxygen. The chemical heating element heats up your hands for 8-10 hours, but it's a one-time use system. This creates a lot of unnecessary waste.

For this article, I’ve focused on electricity and battery-powered options. All of the options come with rechargeable batteries and can operate as effective ski gloves with or without the heating element turned on. In most cases, there are also multiple heating modes that you can play with.

Savior Heat Heated Gloves

Best Overall Heated Ski Gloves

My winner
5 Best Heated Ski Gloves - Savior Heat Heated Gloves
Pros

Machine washable

Heats up quickly

Touchscreen-compatible

Comfortable

Reasonable price

Optimal dexterity

Cons

Hart to text with gloves on

Easy to accidentally hit the power button while skiing

The Savior Heat Heated Gloves are my favorite pair of heated gloves. They are comfortable, heat up quickly, the finger and thumb are touchscreen compatible, and the price is average for reliable heated gloves.

Another great aspect is the gloves’ dexterity. There’s lambskin on the interior palm and fingers which makes it a cinch to grip ski poles and phones.

One downside to this pair of gloves is the placement of the power button. When holding ski poles it's possible to inadvertently hit the button while skiing, which could drain the battery. Additionally, with only two touch screen compatible digits, texting will likely require you to take your gloves off.

Despite the small negatives, the Savior Heat Heated Gloves’ quick heating component, comfort and flexibility elevate them above the competition.

Savior Heat Heated Gloves

Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Gloves

Best Heated Ski Glove for Raynaud’s Disease

My winner
5 Best Heated Ski Gloves - Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Gloves
Pros

Heats up quickly

Gets VERY warm

Comfortable

Waterproof Gore-Tex membrane

Battery charges in 2 hours

Cons

Lack of dexterity

Price

Raynauds is a disease that causes areas of your body (like fingers and toes) to go numb in cold weather. Luckily the Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Gloves get very warm, very fast and keeps your hands toasty. These gloves are also comfortable to wear, waterproof, and the batteries charge in roughly 2 hours.

There are a few small downsides with the gloves, like the hefty price, which is nearly twice what my overall favorite pair of gloves cost. Outdoor Research Lucent gloves work well for skiing but aren't nearly as flexible as other models, making it harder to grip smaller objects like phones.

Even with some downsides, the Outdoor Research Lucent is one of the warmest gloves I've tested. I love how it handles extremely cold conditions by warming up the entire glove.

Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Gloves

Snow Deer Heated Gloves

Best Heated Ski Gloves for Women

My winner
5 Best Heated Ski Gloves - Snow Deer Heated Gloves
Pros

Reasonable price

Touchscreen compatible 

Comfortable

Warm

Good customer service

Cons

Stiff

Battery drains quickly

The Snow Deer Heated Gloves are excellent ski gloves for women. The gloves are well insulated, come with three heat settings, and warm up quickly.

These gloves come with a touch screen compatible index finger and thumb and are available at a reasonable price. Snow Deer has also crafted a reputation for pleasant and responsive customer service.

The gloves do sacrifice some dexterity for bulk and warmth, which makes handling technology difficult. The heating element, while effective, also drains the battery quickly and won’t last a whole ski day on the highest setting. For the best results, it's best to buy and bring an extra set of batteries.

Snow Deer Heated Gloves

Ororo Heated Gloves

Heated Ski Gloves With Long Battery

My winner
5 Best Heated Ski Gloves - Ororo Heated Gloves
Pros

Longer battery life

3 temperature settings

Touchscreen compatible

Consistent warmth

Comfortable

Cons

Sizes run small

Only heats the back of your hand

The Ororo Heated Gloves take the prize for the longest battery life. They can last for a fantastic 7 hours on the lower heat setting. Like all heated gloves, the higher settings drain the battery quickly. However, you still get 3 full hours on the highest heat setting. Additionally, the gloves heat up consistently, are comfortable, and the index finger is touchscreen compatible.

While the heat diffuses well across most of the glove, it doesn't extend to the inside. This may be noticeable after gripping ski poles for a while. The sizing also runs small, so I recommend buying a size larger than you normally would.

If you want consistent heat for a long time, the Ororo has the battery power to get you through a full ski day.

Ororo Heated Gloves

EEIEER Heated Gloves

Best Value Heated Ski Gloves

My winner
5 Best Heated Ski Gloves - EEIEER Heated Gloves
Pros

Bargain price

Touchscreen compatible 

4 different heat settings

Heats up quickly

Comfortable

Cons

Doesn’t heat the whole hand

Not very durable

EEIEER Heated Gloves are my pick for the best value heated ski glove. Coupling touchscreen compatibility in the index finger and thumb with four different heat settings, you get a lot for a bargain price. The gloves are also warm and comfortable without turning on the heat.

One of the trade-offs for the price is that these gloves aren’t the most durable option out there. They can rip if you're carrying or handling sharp objects like ski edges. Also, the heating component, while responsive, doesn’t extend to the palm. This can leave parts of your hand cold while others stay warm.

Still, for the budget price, it’s hard to overlook the benefits of the EEIEER Heated Gloves.

EEIEER Heated Gloves

Pros
Cons

Verdict:

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Alternatives to Heated Ski Gloves

Heated ski gloves aren’t the only ways to deal with harsh conditions. If you’re looking for alternatives, you can pick up a set of hand warmers. Hand warmers are chemically activated and last for a full day of skiing. The downside is that they are one-time-use items, which creates a lot of waste.

If you have a flexible schedule, you can choose to avoid days with frigid temperatures. This is a bit harder if you’ve already planned a destination ski trip. In this case, take breaks often and map out where warming huts are on the ski hill. You can also buy heated glove liners, which still provide heat without the bulk of ski gloves.

Another strategy is to use mittens, which you can find at cheaper prices than heated gloves. Mittens don’t offer much dexterity or touchscreen compatibility. However, instead of individual fingers, you have all four fingers touching. This setup provides extra warmth by increasing heat retention between your digits.

Heated Ski Glove Buying Guide

When considering whether or not to buy heated ski gloves, keep the following points in mind to help you find the best options.

Material/Insulation

Heated ski gloves use different materials to keep your hands warm in frigid temperatures. Look for non-slip grips in the palms for better ski pole holding and 3M Thinsulate or 100-200g of Enduraloft Primaloft synthetic insulation. Everything should be wrapped in one or multiple waterproof layers to keep your hands warm and dry.

Battery Life

Battery duration and efficiency are important points to consider when selecting a pair of heated gloves. These gloves usually rely on rechargeable batteries to diffuse heat. Some come with multiple heat settings or modes.

If a company says their gloves last 7-8 hours, that estimation refers to the lower power modes. If you set your gloves' heating levels at the highest option, the battery will drain much faster. If possible, buy and carry extra battery packs with you, especially for frigid days. 

Warm-up Time/Heating Power

While most heated gloves warm up quickly, it's worth spending a little time checking individual models to see how long the warm-up takes. For those with cold hands, poor circulation, or Raynaud’s, the faster the glove heats up, the less discomfort you'll feel.

How the glove heats up is important too. Look for models that heat up the entire glove, instead of only heating up the back of the hand, for example. 

Many heated ski gloves will also come with multiple temperature settings. This is a great feature for very cold days, but, again, the hotter settings will drain the battery faster.

Waterproofing

Most ski gloves are waterproof gloves. They're usually made with a waterproof membrane or are at least weather resistant. Given the wet and cold conditions common in winter, it wouldn't make sense to buy a glove without these elements. 

A non-waterproof glove can accelerate circulatory issues by hanging on to moisture and freezing your fingers. The best waterproof ski gloves can handle cold and wet conditions while keeping your hands dry.

Budget

As with most purchases, there is a price element to consider. Several budget options exist, allowing you to buy heated gloves relatively cheaply. However, there are downsides to the less-expensive options.

While affordable gloves are great, you may experience battery issues over time, like inefficient charging or subpar battery life. Budget gloves can also rip or wear down faster than others, which creates problems in wet conditions.

Expensive gloves are usually made by companies that use better materials and often have a more flexible return policy. In cases of poor circulation or Raynaud's, it's probably worth getting expensive gloves that heat up faster. If you just want the assurance of having a heating element in a pair of ski gloves, a cheaper option will work.

Summary

My choice for the best overall heated ski glove is the very capable Savior Heat Heated Gloves. If you’re worried about price, the EEIEER Heated Gloves are my budget pick. They can keep your hands warm for a fraction of the price of more expensive models.

For those suffering from poor circulation or Raynaud’s disease, the Outdoor Research Lucent is the warmest model and heats up very quickly. If battery life is the biggest concern, the Ororo Heated Gloves can last a whole ski day.

Common questions

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I’m happiest on long backpacking trips into little-known pockets of wilderness, skiing down backcountry mountains, and on all-fours, scrambling the rocky spines of alpine ridges. When I'm not adventuring in the outdoors, I'm most likely writing about them.

*The information on this site is based on research and first-hand experience but should not be treated as medical advice. Before beginning any new activity, we recommend consulting with a physician, nutritionist or other relevant professional healthcare provider.

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